Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic
Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic
Eilís Quinn is a journalist and manages Radio Canada International’s Eye on the Arctic circumpolar news project. At Eye on the Arctic, Eilís has produced documentary and multimedia series about climate change and the issues facing Indigenous peoples in the circumpolar world. Her documentary Bridging the Divide was a finalist at the 2012 Webby Awards. Eilís began reporting on the North in 2001. Her work as a reporter in Canada and the United States, and as TV host for the Discovery/BBC Worldwide series "Best in China" has taken her to some of the world’s coldest regions including the Tibetan mountains, Greenland and Alaska; along with the Arctic regions of Canada, Russia, Norway and Iceland.

Environment

Increasing ocean acidification ushering in an era of uncertainty for Arctic, says report

Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  If left unchecked, acidification levels in the Arctic Ocean will have significant consequences for northern communities as well as the rest of the globe says a report released» 

Indigenous

Indigenous Cultural Tourism: How the North is learning from community success in southern Canada

Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  The successes of cultural tourism in Canada’s southern Aboriginal communities are providing an important roadmap for development of Indigenous cultural tourism in the North, a sector expected to» 

Politics

Policing infrastructure rejig in Canada’s northwestern Yukon territory

Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and the Government of Yukon announced new plans this week for policing infrastructure in the territory. Besides renovations to police buildings in» 

Indigenous

Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from across the North This week on Eye on the Arctic, we’re dipping into our video vault for a look at hunting culture in today’s Arctic. Robin Aupilaq Avaala lives in the community of Baker» 

Environment

Feature Interview: Is Arctic climate research missing the big picture?

Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  This week, we bring you another instalment of our occasional series looking at how climate change is affecting different parts of the circumpolar world. Arctic climate change is» 

Environment

Indigenous reindeer herders request emergency aid after drought, wildfires

Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  This week, we bring you another instalment of our occasional series looking at how climate change is affecting not only the Canadian North, but different parts of the» 

Internet, Science and Technology

$125.2 million announced for high-speed internet in Inuit region of Arctic Quebec

Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  Ottawa and the province of Quebec announced $125.2 million this week to help improve high-speed internet in Nunavik, the Inuit region of northern Quebec. The money will go» 

Internet, Science and Technology

How traditional Inuit knowledge guides research: Eye on the Arctic video archive

Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North. In today’s instalment, a video from our documentary archive. The Arctic is warming at twice the rate as the rest of the world and Arctic indigenous communities are» 

Indigenous

Feature Interview: International Inuit leader stresses importance of Indigenous voices on world stage

Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  As global players ramp up interest in the Arctic, the organization representing the world’s Inuit wrapped up their general assembly in Alaska in July with a pledge to» 

Environment

Is climate change luring sharks north? Communities wrestle with bite mystery off Arctic coast

Eye on the Arctic brings you stories and newsmakers from around the North.  Sometimes it’s seals with amputated flippers. Or even a sea lion snatched seemingly out of thin air. But for at least 10 years, subsistence harvesters in Alaska’s coastal»