Columns

VIEW COLUMNS

BIBLIO-FILE

Photo

Canadian author Priscila Uppal explores literature from Canada and beyond.

Half-Blood Blues by Esi Edugyan

Winner of the $50,000 Scotiabank Giller Prize, Esi Edugyan's Half-Blood Blues tells the story of black jazz musicians in Berlin and Paris at the start of World War II, and a man haunted decades later by the fate of a talented young trumpeter taken to the camps. The Link’s resident book-reviewer Priscila Uppal looks at why this book has struck a chord with readers around the world. (Thomas Allen Publishers, trade paperback, $24.95)

Vous devez avoir la dernière version de Flash Player installée.
The Dog on the Bed

A Canine Alphabet byRichard Teleky: In today's Bibliofile, Priscila Uppal discusses a new book for the dog-lover in your life. In The Dog on the Bed: A Canine Alphabet, award-winning author Richard Teleky takes us through the As to Zs of the dog-human relationship, with short, engaging essays on everything dog from dog books to dog movies to dog activism to dog training, war dogs to the language of dogs, and much, much more. (hardcover, Fitzhenry and Whiteside, $24.95)

Vous devez avoir la dernière version de Flash Player installée.
Generation X

Tales for an Accelerate Culture by Douglas Coupland : Book reviewer Priscila Uppal reads Douglas Coupland's internationally bestselling 1990 novel Generation X: Tales for An Accelerated Culture to ask if the novel, which centers of the lives of three over-educated and under-achieving twenty-somethings running away from their pasts in the Mojave Desert of California, is still relevant today. (paperback, St. Martin's Press, 1991, $15.95)

Vous devez avoir la dernière version de Flash Player installée.
The Paradise Motel by Eric McCormack

Book reviewer Priscila Uppal discusses this uncanny, intelligent, and macabre 1989 novel about a man who hears a horrific tale from his estranged seafaring grandfather. The Paradise Motel describes that man’s search for the stories of the four survivors of the tragedy. As Priscila tells us, the subsequent fate of these MacKenzie children gets stranger and stranger and plunges our narrator into the depths of fear, memory, and imagination.

Vous devez avoir la dernière version de Flash Player installée.
Best Canadian Poetry Anthology 2011

As this year's guest editor, The Link’s book reviewer, Priscila Uppal, read through hundreds of issues of literary magazines and journals to compile the 2011 edition of The Best Canadian Poetry in English anthology. She tells us about the collection which features works by established and emerging poets from across the country in styles ranging from lyric to anecdotal, experimental, concrete and visual poetry.

Vous devez avoir la dernière version de Flash Player installée.
Billy Bishop Goes to War

Billy Bishop Goes to War, a play by John Gray with Eric Peterson, is one of the most produced plays in Canadian history. Following a recent revival of the play, 30 years after its original production and featuring its original creators, The Link's book reviewer, Priscila Uppal, explores the continued relevance and popularity of the two-man musical about the Canadian World War I flying ace.

Vous devez avoir la dernière version de Flash Player installée.
The Sisters Brothers by Patrick DeWitt

In today's Bibliofile, Priscila Uppal discusses Patrick DeWitt's The Sisters Brothers, shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, the Giller Prize, and more. Priscila Uppal asks why this book has struck a chord with readers and whether it lives up to all the hype.

Vous devez avoir la dernière version de Flash Player installée.
Monoceros by Suzette Mayr

In today's Bibliofile, Priscila Uppal discusses Suzette Mayr's new novel Monoceros currently long-listed for the 2011 Giller Prize. It revolves around the tragic suicide of a gay teenager at a Catholic high school which precipitates a number of subsequent events in lives of his lover, his lover's girlfriend, students, those who barely knew the boy, and teachers who didn't reach out to him.

Vous devez avoir la dernière version de Flash Player installée.
Beautiful Losers by Leonard Cohen

The popularity of Canadian literary icon Leonard Cohen's bestselling novel Beautiful Losers published in 1966 has since waned. Are the once-shocking scenes of graphic sexual escapades and bizarre drug dens, mixed with religious longing, now dated? The Link's book reviewer, Priscila Uppal, discusses her experience of rereading the novel to assess its status within Canadian literature. (McClelland & Stewart New Canadian Library, paperback, reissue 1991, $10.95)

Vous devez avoir la dernière version de Flash Player installée.
Why Not? Fifteen Reasons to Live by Ray Robertson

The Link's book reviewer Priscila Uppal tells us about Why Not? Fifteen Reasons to Live, in which Canadian novelist Ray Robertson turns debilitating depression into an opportunity for exploring the joys of life. As the title suggests, the book offers fifteen engaging arguments about what can get us up, and keep us up, in the morning; everything from work to friendship to a critical mind to death itself. (Biblioasis, trade paperback 2011, $19.95)

Vous devez avoir la dernière version de Flash Player installée.
*RCI is not responsible for any external content