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LITTLE KNOWN CANADIAN FACTS

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"Canadian, eh? I didn't know that!"

John Tuzo Wilson, the scientist who set the continents adrift

In an encore presentation of this Little Known Canadian Facts segment, columnist Victor Nerenberg introduces John Tuzo Wilson, the scientist who finally explained how and why the Earth’s continents are drifting.

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The Canadian who invented radio

Italian Guglielmo Marconi usually gets the credit for inventing radio. But, as our Little Known Canadian Facts columnist Victor Nerenberg tells us, the truth is that radio, as we know it today, would not have been possible without the pioneering work of Canadian Reginald Aubrey Fessenden.

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Mystery writer Leslie McFarlane

In this encore presentation of Little Known Canadian Facts, columnist Victor Nerenberg introduces us to Leslie McFarlane, a writer most of us have never heard of. As Victor tells us, McFarlane's Hardy Boys mysteries have sold millions and millions of copies in more than 25 languages.

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Encore presentation features Lanier Phillips

In this encore broadcast Victor Nerenberg tells us the tale of Lanier Phillips who died just over a week ago. Phillips was a U.S. Navy seaman whose life was forever changed by the kindness shown to him by the people of Newfoundland in 1942.

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The cardiac pacemaker - a Canadian invention

On this edition of Little Known Canadian Facts, Victor Nerenberg tells the story of the first cardiac pacemaker, invented in Canada by the "Father of Biomedical Engineering", John Hopps.

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Outing gays with the Fruit Machine

Our “Little Known Canadian Facts" columnist Victor Nerenberg digs into the Cold War era and uncovers a device that was known derogatorily as The Fruit Machine. It was built to identify homosexuals in the Canadian public service.

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Legendary Arctic aviator Johnny May

Columnist Victor Nerenberg introduces us to Johnny May, the first native-Canadian pilot in the eastern Arctic, and an inductee in the Aerospace Hall of Fame of Quebec.

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The TransCanada Highway

Most Canadians are familiar with sectons of the roadway, but many may be surprised by what they learn in this encore presentation of a segment prepared by columnist Victor Nerenberg in January of 2010.  
Victor explores the origins and history of the ‘T-Can’, the longest national highway in the world at 7,821 kilometres or 4,860 miles. People have been driving it for 50 years now.

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Radio, a Canadian invention

Who invented radio? Italian Guglielmo Marconi usually gets the credit. But the truth is that radio, as we know it today, would not have been possible without the pioneering work of Canadian Reginald Aubrey Fessenden. Victor Nerenberg takes a look back at the earliest days of radio and the man who was key to its development. 

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Basketball's James Naismith

Victor Nerenberg explores the invention of the game of basketball by James Naismith, a Canadian who was from Almonte, Ontario and who attended Montreal's McGill University.

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