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Lou Hooper

This is the 15th year that Black History Month is being celebrated across Canada. During this month, The Link is featuring stories highlighting some of the many ways Black Canadians have helped shape our nation.

Today we hear about Lou Hooper, the man who was once Oscar Peterson’s piano teacher. Interestingly, one of Lou Hooper’s last albums, was put out by Radio Canada International in 1973. It featured ragtime tunes including his own classics: The Cakewalk, Black Cat Blues, South Sea Strut and Uncle Remus Stomp. Lou Hooper died in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island in 1977.
 

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