The Link

Team

The Link is an hour-long daily radio show aimed at connecting people to Canada and Canada to the world. Plug in to our show for Canadian news and stories. Find out what’s new and exciting on Canada’s cultural landscape. And get the pulse on what’s happening in Canada today. Whether you live inside or outside the country, just tune in to The Link and get connected.


	Marc Montgomery
	When I was young, the radio was always my friend. Entertaining and informing, it often brought far off places much closer. Later, many jobs took me from place to place in Canada and Europe. Now a proud member of the wonderful

Host

Marc Montgomery
When I was young, the radio was always my friend. Entertaining and informing, it often brought far off places much closer. Later, many jobs took me from place to place in Canada and Europe. Now a proud member of the wonderful "Link" team, we have a great time working together to try to make unique radio with, about and for new arrivals to this country.


	Carmel Kilkenny
	I was born and raised in Toronto by parents whose “home” was somewhere else. After a visit to Ireland as a child and meeting all the family I'd only ever heard stories of, it became a “home” to me too. As a young woman, a year in Paris provided amazing insight into the experience of moving to a new country. I returned to continue my education in Montreal, and now find myself bringing my children “home” to visit Toronto.

Features Broadcaster

Carmel Kilkenny
I was born and raised in Toronto by parents whose “home” was somewhere else. After a visit to Ireland as a child and meeting all the family I'd only ever heard stories of, it became a “home” to me too. As a young woman, a year in Paris provided amazing insight into the experience of moving to a new country. I returned to continue my education in Montreal, and now find myself bringing my children “home” to visit Toronto.


	Levon Sevunts
	Born and raised in Armenia, I started my journalistic career in 1990, covering wars and civil strife in the Caucasus and Central Asia. In 1992, after the government in Armenia shut down the TV program I was working for, I immigrated to Canada. I learned English and eventually came back to journalism, working first in print and then in broadcasting. My work has appeared in major Canadian and U.S. newspapers, including The Globe and Mail, The National Post, The Toronto Star, The New York Times and The Washington Times. My journalistic travels have taken me from the Canadian Arctic to Sahara and the killing fields of Darfur, from the streets of Montreal to the snow-capped mountaintops of Hindu Kush in Afghanistan. But best of all, I’ve been privileged to tell the stories of hundreds of people who’ve generously opened up their homes, refugee tents and their hearts to me.

Producer

Levon Sevunts
Born and raised in Armenia, I started my journalistic career in 1990, covering wars and civil strife in the Caucasus and Central Asia. In 1992, after the government in Armenia shut down the TV program I was working for, I immigrated to Canada. I learned English and eventually came back to journalism, working first in print and then in broadcasting. My work has appeared in major Canadian and U.S. newspapers, including The Globe and Mail, The National Post, The Toronto Star, The New York Times and The Washington Times. My journalistic travels have taken me from the Canadian Arctic to Sahara and the killing fields of Darfur, from the streets of Montreal to the snow-capped mountaintops of Hindu Kush in Afghanistan. But best of all, I’ve been privileged to tell the stories of hundreds of people who’ve generously opened up their homes, refugee tents and their hearts to me.


	Lynn Desjardins
	I'm a native Montrealer with Lebanese grandparents on one side, French-Canadian on the other. I grew up in a French neighbourhood and went to English schools with the children of immigrants from Ukraine, Egypt, China, Morocco and elsewhere around the world. I've always had a fascination with the myriad of cultures, political debates and foods, as well as a deep understanding of Canada's

Features Broadcaster

Lynn Desjardins
I'm a native Montrealer with Lebanese grandparents on one side, French-Canadian on the other. I grew up in a French neighbourhood and went to English schools with the children of immigrants from Ukraine, Egypt, China, Morocco and elsewhere around the world. I've always had a fascination with the myriad of cultures, political debates and foods, as well as a deep understanding of Canada's "two solitudes" - the English and French. Broadcasting stories that matter is my passion.


	Rashi Khilnani
	Born in India, raised in Nigeria and having travelled to over 20 countries, I bring a global perspective to my work. As a political science and international development graduate of McGill University, I'm fascinated with people worldwide - how they live, think and interact with each other. Anything from global conflict to mental health issues are of interest to me. I've also studied international journalism at City University in London, England, and spent a few years working there, with stints at the Associated Press, FT Group and researching for Time magazine. My work has been published in the Globe & Mail, the National Post and the Ottawa Citizen. I'm curious about life and I hope this translates into my stories.

Features Broadcaster and Indo-Canadian Report Columnist

Rashi Khilnani
Born in India, raised in Nigeria and having travelled to over 20 countries, I bring a global perspective to my work. As a political science and international development graduate of McGill University, I'm fascinated with people worldwide - how they live, think and interact with each other. Anything from global conflict to mental health issues are of interest to me. I've also studied international journalism at City University in London, England, and spent a few years working there, with stints at the Associated Press, FT Group and researching for Time magazine. My work has been published in the Globe & Mail, the National Post and the Ottawa Citizen. I'm curious about life and I hope this translates into my stories.


	Robert Jaros
	
	Born in Montréal of Slovak and French-Canadian parents, my 30-year career in broadcast journalism has allowed me to explore much of Canada and meet amazing people with fascinating stories to tell. Nowadays, I bring you stories from the Atlantic Coast, about the way of living of its dynamic people, its vibrant cultural scene and its growing diversity. I hope you’ll enjoy as much as I do discovering what makes this region of Canada unique.
	 

East Coast National Reporter

Robert Jaros
Born in Montréal of Slovak and French-Canadian parents, my 30-year career in broadcast journalism has allowed me to explore much of Canada and meet amazing people with fascinating stories to tell. Nowadays, I bring you stories from the Atlantic Coast, about the way of living of its dynamic people, its vibrant cultural scene and its growing diversity. I hope you’ll enjoy as much as I do discovering what makes this region of Canada unique.
 


	Valérie Morand
	Like most of the French settlers who came to New France, both my ancestors were in for a rough life. They worked the land to help build what eventually became West Quebec and the Gaspe Peninsula. I was born in St-Eustache, on the outskirts of Montreal, in the same town where my great, great grandfather fought more than 150 years ago. The town is famous for the 1837 Patriote rebellion, the failed revolt by French-Canadian peasants seeking greater autonomy. The political landscape has changed drastically since then. Still, being to able to live and work in Canada in French is precious to me, as is living in a democracy which guarantees rights and freedom to individuals regardless of their race or color.

Ottawa Correspondent

Valérie Morand
Like most of the French settlers who came to New France, both my ancestors were in for a rough life. They worked the land to help build what eventually became West Quebec and the Gaspe Peninsula. I was born in St-Eustache, on the outskirts of Montreal, in the same town where my great, great grandfather fought more than 150 years ago. The town is famous for the 1837 Patriote rebellion, the failed revolt by French-Canadian peasants seeking greater autonomy. The political landscape has changed drastically since then. Still, being to able to live and work in Canada in French is precious to me, as is living in a democracy which guarantees rights and freedom to individuals regardless of their race or color.


	Lyne-Francoise Pelletier
	My ancestors came from France some 350 years ago seeking freedom, security and a better life for their children. They found what they were looking for and much much more. They also found upon their arrival a land of rugged beauty: rivers and streams, forests and meadows stretched beyond their eyesight. While some of my ancestry took to farming the land, others took to the woods and became Voyageurs and explorers of this great land. The travelling bug and the intense curiosity for what makes Canada such a distinct country has not died with the following generations. I have been fortunate to work as a documentary filmmaker, a television and radio reporter in many cities and provinces across Canada. Through the decades that took me from coast to coast to coast, I have witnessed events, listenned and talked with people about what makes this country so unique. I have learned that geography, topography, language, politics, regionalism and, yes the weather, are all factors that influence who we are as a people. We might be different from one province to the other but we all share the same values of freedom, justice and democracy for all that live in this country we call ours.

National reporter for the Toronto bureau in Ontario

Lyne-Francoise Pelletier
My ancestors came from France some 350 years ago seeking freedom, security and a better life for their children. They found what they were looking for and much much more. They also found upon their arrival a land of rugged beauty: rivers and streams, forests and meadows stretched beyond their eyesight. While some of my ancestry took to farming the land, others took to the woods and became Voyageurs and explorers of this great land. The travelling bug and the intense curiosity for what makes Canada such a distinct country has not died with the following generations. I have been fortunate to work as a documentary filmmaker, a television and radio reporter in many cities and provinces across Canada. Through the decades that took me from coast to coast to coast, I have witnessed events, listenned and talked with people about what makes this country so unique. I have learned that geography, topography, language, politics, regionalism and, yes the weather, are all factors that influence who we are as a people. We might be different from one province to the other but we all share the same values of freedom, justice and democracy for all that live in this country we call ours.


	Lorn Curry
	There's a game a lot of Canadians play that involves figuring out how many fractions they can break themselves into based on their family tree: one third ziluanian on his mother's side, three-fourths Arthurian legend on his second cousin's side, four-fifths of gin on his uncle John's side. That sort of thing. Me? I'm half Acadian on my mom's side and half Lebanese on my dad's. Unfortunately, I never got to know my paternal grandfather - a general store merchant. But I do remember, as a child, discovering grandfather's handwritten order books which my dad kept as mementos. I'd never seen anything as fascinating! I had no idea what the words meant, but the arabic handwriting was so beautiful, so exotic... I don't know what ever became of those family artifacts, but I still remember the lesson I learned from them: that the world is a lot bigger and vastly different than even the wildest imaginings of a little boy can conjure up. And I think we should all celebrate that fact.

West Coast National Reporter

Lorn Curry
There's a game a lot of Canadians play that involves figuring out how many fractions they can break themselves into based on their family tree: one third ziluanian on his mother's side, three-fourths Arthurian legend on his second cousin's side, four-fifths of gin on his uncle John's side. That sort of thing. Me? I'm half Acadian on my mom's side and half Lebanese on my dad's. Unfortunately, I never got to know my paternal grandfather - a general store merchant. But I do remember, as a child, discovering grandfather's handwritten order books which my dad kept as mementos. I'd never seen anything as fascinating! I had no idea what the words meant, but the arabic handwriting was so beautiful, so exotic... I don't know what ever became of those family artifacts, but I still remember the lesson I learned from them: that the world is a lot bigger and vastly different than even the wildest imaginings of a little boy can conjure up. And I think we should all celebrate that fact.


	Frank Rackow
	Grew up in Ottawa and spent time in Europe and Quebec before migrating to western Canada. The move, as it turns out, is somewhat of a return to his roots. Frank's great-grandfather arrived in Winnipeg from Russia in 1882, that's exactly 125 years ago, an anniversary that will be celebrated at a family reunion this year.
	When not gracing the stages of Canada's music clubs and festivals with his various musical formations, Frank can generally be found playing in the Rocky mountains with his telemark skis or mountain bike, or driving his kids to hockey practice, music lessons and just about any other activity their hearts desire.

Calgary-based prairie correspondent

Frank Rackow
Grew up in Ottawa and spent time in Europe and Quebec before migrating to western Canada. The move, as it turns out, is somewhat of a return to his roots. Frank's great-grandfather arrived in Winnipeg from Russia in 1882, that's exactly 125 years ago, an anniversary that will be celebrated at a family reunion this year.
When not gracing the stages of Canada's music clubs and festivals with his various musical formations, Frank can generally be found playing in the Rocky mountains with his telemark skis or mountain bike, or driving his kids to hockey practice, music lessons and just about any other activity their hearts desire.

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