Record numbers for Swedish wild salmon

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(iStock)
(iStock)
Salmon are surging up Sweden’s rivers in record numbers.

In the biggest river, Tornea älv in Norrbotte, over 100,000 salmon have swum past the counters.

Swedish Radio reports the Baltic salmon may be more numerous than any time since the Second World War.

The salmon are swimming upriver to reproduce, in their spawning grounds.

Last year was also a historical record for rovers such as Vindelälven.

Researchers say there are several possible explanations for the increase in fish. Tougher rules on industrial fishing in the Baltic can have meant more young salmon surviving.  And waterways  are being better looked after, with riverbeds restored by nature conservation groups that have bought up the fishing rights.

Researcher Johan Östergren says to Swedish radio the warmer weather may also have played a part, with a warm winter meaning more fish coming in to breed.

But in several areas Swedish wild salmon populations are still vulnerable, such as in Öreälven, Emån and in Rickleån, warns Johan Östergren.

Related stories from around the North:

United States:  Northwest Alaska villagers concerned about dead salmon washing up along Kobuk River, ADN

Canada: Is a fishing boom in the Arctic a sure thing?, Eye on the Arctic

Finland:  Fishing-net death toll of endangered seals continues to rise in Finland, Yle News

Greenland: Greenland meeting to discuss Arctic fishing, Radio Canada International

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Radio Sweden

Radio Sweden

For more news from Sweden visit Radio Sweden.