All Arctic Council, all the time – Arctic week in Review

Share
United States Secretary of State John Kerry, Canadian Minister for the Arctic Council Leona Aglukkaq, and Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Rob Nicholson pose with Inuit wearing traditional dress at the Arctic Council Ministerial meeting Friday, April 24, 2015 in Iqaluit, Nunavut. Ministers from the eight Arctic nations and the leaders of northern indigenous groups form the Council. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)
United States Secretary of State John Kerry, Canadian Minister for the Arctic Council Leona Aglukkaq, and Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Rob Nicholson pose with Inuit wearing traditional dress at the Arctic Council Ministerial meeting Friday, April 24, 2015 in Iqaluit, Nunavut. Ministers from the eight Arctic nations and the leaders of northern indigenous groups form the Council. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)
On this week’s news round-up, we bring you some of your most read stories on Eye on the Arctic this week, and it was pretty much all Arctic Council, all the time:

-Arctic expert Heather Exner-Pirot looks at the Arctic Council winners and losers, and some of her conclusions may surprise you.

– Arctic indigenous peoples warn the international community that continued tensions with Russia could erode progress made on circumpolar cooperation since the end of the Cold War

– The U.S. lays out a climate-focused agenda as it takes over the chairmanship from Canada

– Mia Bennett, from the Cryopolitics Arctic News & Analysis blog, compares the Iqaluit ministerial to the 2013 ministerial in Kiruna, Sweden

-And before we go, we’ll leave you with the one non-Arctic Council story that dominated our headlines this week, and that’s a report from the Barents Observer looking at Soviet-era nuclear submarine pollution in the North

That’s all from us this week! We’ll be back on Monday with more stories and newsmakers from across the North.

Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

Share
Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn is a journalist and manages Radio Canada International’s Eye on the Arctic circumpolar news project. At Eye on the Arctic, Eilís has produced documentary and multimedia series about climate change and the issues facing Indigenous peoples in the circumpolar world. Her documentary Bridging the Divide was a finalist at the 2012 Webby Awards. Eilís began reporting on the North in 2001. Her work as a reporter in Canada and the United States, and as TV host for the Discovery/BBC Worldwide series "Best in China" has taken her to some of the world’s coldest regions including the Tibetan mountains, Greenland and Alaska; along with the Arctic regions of Canada, Russia, Norway and Iceland.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *