Seasonal foods threatened by pollution problems, Swedish study says

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According to researchers, people should consider alternatives to eel, herring, salmon and Christmas ham. (Laurent Boursier/Radio-Canada)
Christmas dinner could be set to change, according to BalticEye, a research organisation based at Stockholm University.

The amount of herring used as feed on fish farms, and the use of soy beans as feed for agricultural livestock, such as cows and pigs, produce more nitrogen and phosphorus, which eventually find their way into the Baltic Sea.

Patrick Henricksson, a researcher at Stockholm University’s Resilience Centre, the Beijer Institute, and World Fish, said people should consider the alternatives to eel, herring, salmon and the Christmas ham, although he respects people’s traditional Christmas food choices.

The alternatives include Clarias (an African catfish) instead of eel or salmon, and a vegetarian ham instead of the traditional Christmas ham.

Related links from around the North:

Canada: In Northern Canada, researchers pull big fish from lakes in hopes of reducing toxic mercury risk, CBC News

Finland: Is toxic waste behind dead mussel horde in Finnish river?, Yle News

Norway: Climate change is driving micro-algae blooms into High Arctic and may affect food chains, says study, Eye on the Arctic

Russia: Russia’s Arctic nuclear dump could become promising fishing area, The Independent Barents Observer

United States: America’s most toxic site is in the Alaskan Arctic, Cryopolitics Blog

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Simon Linter, Radio Sweden

Simon Linter, Radio Sweden

For more news from Sweden visit Radio Sweden.

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