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Remembering Our Original True Stories

This documentary follows a seventh generation Black Canadian man who goes to Jamaica for the second time, on a mission to document and reconnect with his Jamaican Maroons Roots. At Stepney Elementary School, in the birthplace of the legendary Bob Marley, as Papa Grand teaches and shares the oral history passed down to him from his Nova Scotian ancestors as well as from the Maroons of Acompong Town, Trelaney and Portland; he soon realises that he is actually fulfilling his life’s purpose: to redefine his strong and everlasting roots, and to one day discover and realise our original true story.

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A film by Garry James
Documentary, Toronto, 2010, 8 min from the Roots Challenge 2010

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