Monika Schaefer from a Holocaust denial video (YouTube)

Update: Canadian couple convicted in Germany for hate

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The German law is called “Volksverhetzung” which loosely translates as “incitement to hatred”.  In a trial which ended last Friday, a Canadian woman was convicted for her 2016 youtube video which claimed the Holocaust never happened and that it was a “six million lie”.

Her brother Alfred, aged 63, was also convicted under the same law.

Monika Schaefer, aged 59, of Jasper Alberta was visiting Germany  in January to attend the trial of another Holocaust denier, Sylvia Stolz who was later convicted of Holocaust denial.

She was arrested at the time and faced six charges. She was held in prison since then while the trial took place as both she and her brother were considered “flight risks” and could find shelter among sympathisers.

Convicted last week she was sentenced to 10 months in jail, but has been released owing to time already served.

Canadian-born Schaefer aged 59, had been a federal candidate for the Green Party in Alberta, running unsuccessfully three times starting in 2006 before she was rejected by the party when her views became known.

Alfred Schaefer at a Holocaust denial rally in June in Nuremburg making a comment about how high a dog can jump and using that as an excuse to give what could easily be interpreted as a Nazi salute to a receptive audience. (YouTube via B’nai Brith”

Her brother Alfred, a German-Canadian, who apparently labelled the trial as an “inquisition” had been arrested in connection with several denial videos and a speech at a rally in Dresden with a well-known Holocaust denier Gerhard Ittner.  He was filmed at another rally in June in Nuremburg. Facing 11 charges, Alfred Schaefer was found guilty and was handed a stiffer sentence of three years and two months.

Additional information-sources

CBC: W Snowdon: Oct 26/18: Monika Schaefer convicted

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/monika-schaefer-holocaust-denial-alberta-germany-1.4880175

Canadian Press (via Huffington Post) Oct 27:18: ex-Green candidate convicted in Germany

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/10/27/monika-schaefer-germany_a_23573291/

B’nai Brith Canada: May 8/18: Alfred Schaeffer conviction

https://www.bnaibrith.ca/canadian_alfred_schaefer_convicted_of_holocaust_denial_in_germany

Sachische Zeitung: A Schneider: May 5/18: Alfred Schaefer convicted for Holocaust denial

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=de&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=https://www.sz-online.de/nachrichten/62-jaehriger-wegen-holocaust-leugnens-verurteilt-3931021.html&edit-text=&act=url

B”nai Brith: Jul 5/18: Schaefer’s on trial

https://www.bnaibrith.ca/hate_crimes_trial_under_way_for_german_canadian_siblings

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2 comments on “Update: Canadian couple convicted in Germany for hate
  1. Avatar Ursula Wagner says:

    I simply have to look for words to express my dismay about this comment.

    But what else can one expect from a German-born Australian right-wing extremist and holocaust denier as Dr. Fredrick Toben.

    Before I read this post I never heard of Zundel. By looking him up in the net I found this one.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sN92noK1E6w

    And it makes me simply speechless, that someone like Ernst Zundel was not stopped by Canadian authority in his activities.

    Hopefully these Nazi pest will be stopped one day!

  2. Avatar Dr Fredrick Toben says:

    The German law is, like the other equivalent Human Rights Laws, a watered-down defamation law but where truth is no defence.

    In fact there is no defence and a justification in court is considered by the judge proof of the defendant having “criminal energy”, thereby committing another criminal act in court.

    When a judgment is handed down, the lying media claims it is a “Holocaust denial” conviction, when in fact the shut-up and defamatory terms used against the accused are never legally defined during the proceedings – “hater”, “Holocaust denier”, “antisemite”, “racist”, “Nazi”, etc.

    Why is this not mentioned in your article that the Schaefer Siblings never had a chance of defending themselves against a law where guilt is pronounced on a normative feeling of hurt caused by what was said or written?

    Remember that Ernst Zundel won against the fabrications that saw him taken to court for “spreading false news” but was then threatened with the new human rights laws because his two 1984-5 and 1988 trials for the first and last time proved the “Holocaust” narrative does not stand up to legal scrutiny, and so the new Human Rights twisted law needed to be used so that the loudest Holocaust survivor liars gained legal protection for telling lies in court.

    Think on these things.