Highlights / insecticide

Economy, Environment & Animal Life, Health, International

EU bans another neonic insecticide, Canada stalls

Concerns include human health issues The European Commission this week voted not to renew the approval for ‘thiacloprid’ a Bayer /Monsanto insecticide marketed there under the brands Calypso and Biscaya. This is the fourth neonicotinoid insecticide that has been banned »

White throated sparrows like this were studied for the effects of a common neonicotinoid insecticide which could end up in their diet of seeds (Wiki commons- Cephas)

Environment & Animal Life, Highlights, International

Study shows dramatic songbird decline possibly linked to insecticide

Songbird populations around the world have been in steep decline in recent years and scientists have been searching for reasons. In North America the populations of more than 75 per cent of songbirds and other seed–eating birds have declined considerably »

Environment & Animal Life

Insecticide toxic to songbirds: study

Research at the University of Saskatchewan has linked the use of two kinds of widely-used insecticides to serious health issues in songbirds.  Scientists found that imidacloprid (neonicotinoid) and chlorpyrifos (organophosphate) are directly toxic to songbirds that eat seeds. Tests on »

Economy, Environment & Animal Life, Health, International, Internet, Science & Technology

Toxic pesticide traces in honey

Honey is one of nature’s oldest natural sweeteners. However scientists have discovered that this natural product now has something very unnatural in it, toxic neonicotinoid pesticides. The neonicotinoid group of chemicals are the most common class of pesticide in world-wide »

Environment & Animal Life, Health, Highlights, Internet, Science & Technology

Sex beats poison when it comes to insect control

with files from Emily Chung, CBC With the sometimes bitter debate continues over widespread farm use of the insecticide family of neonicotinoids, another alternative is making inroads. There has been a battle between environmentalists, scientists and beekeepers on one hand, »