Highlights / Japanese

William Gun Chong circa 1943. Photo presumably taken between missions when he was often dressed in worn clothes as a homeless peasant to avoid Japanese forces attention as he carried out his missions ( via Chinese Canadian Military Museum)

Immigration & Refugees, International, Society

Asian Heritage Month: Canadian secret agent and hero William Gun Chong

The unlikely Canadian undercover agent awarded the British Empire Medal Unlike the dapper spies of movies, an undercover agent has to be inconspicuous. Thus, Canadian Bill Chong, often dressed like a homeless peasant became one of the most successful of» 

International

History; June 20 1942: Canada under attack!

Japanese shell Canadian lighthouse. In June 1942 the Second World War was now well advanced for Canada which was in full war mode since entering the war in September 1939. The U.S. meanwhile had very quickly geared up after it’s» 

Arts and Entertainment

Canadian museum features Japanese flower arrangements

Canada’s Museum of Nature in Ottawa will soon unveil its 33rd exhibition of Japanese flower arrangements called Ikebana. The show is very popular and features the art of traditional flower design that dates back to 6th century Japan. In celebration» 

Arts and Entertainment, Immigration & Refugees, Society

Empire of the Son: Bridging continents, immigration, and the gap between parent and child

Theatrical presentation of lives and emotions explored Canada’s Tetsuro Shigematsu, a former national radio host, has travelled widely in this country and the world. Perhaps his greatest voyage though has been this most recent trip backward to his father’s life» 

Uncategorized

History Sept. 22, 1988: apology to Japanese-Canadians of WWII

In the late 1930;s and early 1940’s western nations knew Japan was posing a military threat. The full scale of Japanese horrors in their attacks on China in the late 1930’s was not yet realized when on December 7, 1941,» 

Politics, Society

More on forced sale of Japanese Canadians’ assets

When Canada declared war on Japan in World War II, the Canadian government not only took Canadians of Japanese origin away from the homes, it also sold their houses and other property without their permission. New research suggests the western»