Sweden: Vattenfall may pay billions for new nuclear safety requirements

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Magnus Hall, CEO for Swedish power utility company Vattenfall, poses at a press conference in Stockholm on May 7, 2014. (VILHELM STOKSTAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Magnus Hall, CEO for Swedish power utility company Vattenfall, poses at a press conference in Stockholm on May 7, 2014. (VILHELM STOKSTAD/AFP/Getty Images)
New security requirements for nuclear power plants may end up costing Swedish state-owned power company Vattenfall SEK billions.

One of the requirements, introduced in the EU in response to the Fukushima catastrophe, regards the so-called independent emergency core cooling, a cooling system that functions even during loss of power, newspaper Dagens Industri wrote.

Vattenfall owns seven reactors and it will require an investment of SEK billions for each of those reactors. How expensive it will become depends on the safety requirements defined by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority.

Related stories from around the North:

Canada: Canada’s Northwest Territories unveils ambitious energy plan, CBC News

Finland: Safety watchdog issues warning on Finland nuclear project, Yle News

Sweden:  Support for nuclear power falls in Sweden says survey, Radio Sweden

United States:  Villagers suspect nuclear devices buried in Arctic Alaska, Alaska Dispatch

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