Shipping, science and Shell: Arctic week in Review

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The Polar Pioneer oil drilling rig during demonstrations against Royal Dutch Shell on May 16, 2015 in Seattle, Washington. (David Ryder/Getty Images)
The Polar Pioneer oil drilling rig during demonstrations against Royal Dutch Shell on May 16, 2015 in Seattle, Washington. (David Ryder/Getty Images)

On this week’s news round-up, we bring you some of your most read stories from Eye on the Arctic this week:

-Shell’s pullout from offshore operations in Arctic Alaska continued to grab your attention this week, especially stories examining the fact and fiction behind the decision

-As the ice retreats, Arctic shipping is expected to increase. But according to one expert, people’s idea of “Arctic shipping” may be way off the mark

-The eroding coastline in Arctic Alaska is revealing human bones, a report this week explores why it’s happening and how the sites are being preserved.

-Russia announces its intention to launch an Arctic media service that will better promote the country’s activities in the Far North.

-A new NGO forms this month to better promote the rights of Inuit seal hunters around the circumpolar world

 

That’s all from us for now. We’ll be back next week with the latest stories and newsmakers from across the North.

Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

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Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn is a journalist and manages Radio Canada International’s Eye on the Arctic news cooperation project.

Eilís has reported from the Arctic regions of all eight circumpolar countries and has produced numerous documentary and multimedia series about climate change and the issues facing Indigenous peoples in the North.

Her investigative report "Death in the Arctic: A community grieves, a father fights for change," about the violent death of Robert Adams, a 19-year-old Inuk man from Arctic Quebec, received an honourable mention for excellence in reporting on violence and trauma at the 2019 Dart Awards in New York City.

Her multimedia project on the health challenges in the Canadian Arctic, "Bridging the Divide," was a finalist at the 2012 Webby Awards.

Eilís has worked for media organizations in Canada and the United States and as a TV host for the Discovery/BBC Worldwide series "Best in China."

Twitter: @Arctic_EQ

Email: eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

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