Arctic health poorer in Canada

A snowmobiler makes his way through the ice on Frobisher Bay outside of Iqaluit. Canada's Arctic capital of 7,000, like other Arctic communities, is growing rapidly, in part due to migration from smaller communities, according to the second Arctic Human Development Report.  (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)
A snowmobiler makes his way through the ice on Frobisher Bay outside of Iqaluit. Canada’s Arctic capital of 7,000, like other Arctic communities, is growing rapidly, in part due to migration from smaller communities, according to the second Arctic Human Development Report.
(Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)
The well-being of northerners in Canada’s Arctic compares poorly with people in other polar regions of the world, according to a long-running study.

Canadians rank at best in the middle of the pack on infant mortality, tuberculosis, fatal accidents, homicide or suicide, reports the second Arctic Human Development Report.

However, Canada leads the world in other things like innovative governance structures that allow for local participation. The report compares the Arctic regions of Canada, the U.S., Russia, Greenland, Iceland, Scandianavia and regions like the Faroe Islands.

In general, the study found health is strongest in countries like Norway and Finland, where there is little difference between north and south, indigenous and non-indigenous.

The Russian Arctic consistently fares the worst.

Related stories from around the North:

Canada: (Video) Bridging the Divide – Health care in the North, Eye on the Arctic

Greenland: Researchers must be honest with Arctic peoples about food contaminants: doctor, Eye on the Arctic

Norway: Nordic diet a heart-smart alternative, Radio Sweden

Sweden: Demand ups Sweden’s reindeer meat prices, Radio Sweden

United States: Researchers identify Inuit gene responsible for sugar intolerance, Alaska Dispatch News

 

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Lynn Desjardins, Radio Canada International

Born and raised in Montreal, Quebec, Lynn has dedicated her working life to journalism. After decades in the field, she still believes journalism to be a pillar of democracy and she remains committed to telling stories she believes are important or interesting. Lynn loves Canada and embraces all seasons: skiing, skating, and sledding in winter, hiking, swimming and playing tennis in summer and running all the time. She is a voracious consumer of Canadian literature, public radio programs and classical music. Family and friends are most important. Good and unusual foods are fun. She travels when possible and enjoys the wilderness.

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