Final Truth & Reconciliation report released in Canada

Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau wipes his eye after speaking on behalf of the government as the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation commission is released, Tuesday December 15, 2015 in Ottawa. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press)
Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau wipes his eye after speaking on behalf of the government as the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation commission is released, Tuesday December 15, 2015 in Ottawa. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press)
Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission released its final report on Tuesday in an emotional ceremony attended by Canada’s indigenous leaders, church officials and the Prime Minister of Canada.

“The final report provides a way forward for all Canadians building on the formal apology of seven years ago,” said Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, visibly moved as he addressed the commissioners and attendees gathered in Canada’s capital city of Ottawa.

“It sets us squarely on the path to true reconciliation. The government of Canada is committed to walking that path with indigenous peoples in partnership and in friendship.”

Trudeau also reiterated his Liberal government’s promise to implement the 94 recommendations outlined in the report.

Truth and Reconciliation Report

Among the recommendations outlined in the Truth and Reconciliation Final Report:

To read the full report, click HERE

Apology and reconciliation

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission was established after the 2007 Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.

For six years, the commission, lead by Justice Murry Sinclair, travelled to 300 communities across Canada to record survivor testimony and detail the legacy the residential school system still had on Inuit, Métis and First Nations communities today.

Starting in the 1800s, Inuit and First Nations children were sent to the federally funded, primarily church-run schools, far from their communities and their cultures, and often against the wishes of their families. The goal was to assimilate the children into ‘European’ culture.

While some people say the residential school experience was a positive one for them, many children suffered years of physical and sexual abuse in the institutions and were punished for things like speaking their aboriginal languages.

According to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, over 130 of these institutions were located across Canada and more than 150,000 Inuit, Métis and First Nations children passed through the residential school system.

The last of the schools were closed in the 1990s.

Finding ‘middle space’: Inuit leader
"Part of the truth is that the way that we are today: our society, our communities; is affected by the truth of the residential school era," said Natan Obed, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, (pictured above in November 2015) at the Truth and Reconciliation Final Report ceremony on Tuesday. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)
“Part of the truth is that the way that we are today: our society, our communities; is affected by the truth of the residential school era,” said Natan Obed, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, (pictured above in November 2015) at the Truth and Reconciliation Final Report ceremony on Tuesday. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)

Natan Obed, the president of Canada’s national Inuit organization, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami,  received cheers and a standing ovation from the crowd at Tuesday’s ceremony after he praised the commission’s work and how it highlighted the role the residential school legacy still played in the personal struggles of many families and communities.

“Part of the truth is that the way that we are today: our society, our communities; is affected by the truth of the residential school era,” Obed said.  “This is very important and it isn’t a truth that has been recognized enough.

“We are fighting every day to hold on,” he said. “Often we find ourselves in the part of  resolving why it is the we are the way we are. Why our families treat us the way (they) do sometimes.  Why we have to work together to overcome challenges instead of meet new opportunities.”

Obed went on to describe a ‘middle space’ of mutal respect between Canada and its indigenous Peoples where Inuit, First Nations and Metis languages, cultures and socities would be recognized as contributing to Canada’s strength and diversity.

“But we have to fight for that,” he said.

AUDIO

Listen to the full speech from Natan Obed, president of Canada’s national Inuit organization, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Final Report ceremony on Tuesday:

Related stories from around the North:

Canada: Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission releases recommendations, Eye on the Arctic

Finland:  Sámi politician calls Finland “racist country”, Yle News

Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn est une journaliste primée et responsable du site Regard sur l’Arctique/Eye on the Arctic, une coproduction circumpolaire de Radio Canada International. En plus de nouvelles quotidiennes, Eilís produit des documentaires et des séries multimédias qui lui ont permis de se rendre dans les régions arctiques des huit pays circumpolaires. Son enquête journalistique «Arctique – Au-delà de la tragédie » sur le meurtre de Robert Adams, un Inuk de 19 ans du Nord du Québec, a remporté la médaille d’argent dans la catégorie “Best Investigative Article or Series” aux Canadian Online Publishing Awards en 2019. Le reportage a aussi reçu une mention honorable pour son excellence dans la couverture de la violence et des traumatismes aux prix Dart 2019 à New York. Son reportage «Un train pour l’Arctique: Bâtir l'avenir au péril d'une culture?» sur l'impact que pourrait avoir un projet d'infrastructure de plusieurs milliards d'euros sur les communautés autochtones de l'Arctique européen a été finaliste dans la catégorie enquête (médias en ligne) aux prix de l'Association canadienne des journalistes pour l'année 2019. Son documentaire multimedia «Bridging the Divide» sur le système de santé dans l’Arctique canadien a été finaliste aux prix Webby 2012. En outre, son travail sur les changements climatiques dans l'Arctique canadien a été présenté à l'émission scientifique «Découverte» de la chaîne française de Radio-Canada, de même qu'au «Téléjournal», l'émission phare de nouvelles de Radio-Canada. Au cours de sa carrière Eilís a travaillé pour des médias au Canada et aux États-Unis, et comme animatrice pour la série «Best in China» de Discovery/BBC Worldwide. Twitter : @Arctic_EQ Courriel : eilis.quinn@radio-canada.ca

Do you want to report an error or a typo? Click here!

Leave a Reply

Note: By submitting your comments, you acknowledge that Radio Canada International has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Radio Canada International does not endorse any of the views posted. Your comments will be pre-moderated and published if they meet netiquette guidelines.
Netiquette »

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *