New rules proposed for Alaska predator hunting

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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed a new rule Friday on predator hunting in Alaska refuges following in the controversial footsteps of the National Park Service. (iStock)
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed a new rule Friday on predator hunting in Alaska refuges following in the controversial footsteps of the National Park Service. (iStock)
The state of Alaska has, in recent years, loosened the rules for hunting wolves and bears, but federal wildlife managers aren’t going along with it.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Friday proposed new rules for predator hunting on national refuges in Alaska.

The agency has proposed to ban taking brown bears with bait, hunting wolves during the denning season, and trapping bears, among other harvest methods.

The ban would not apply to subsistence hunting, and some methods in the proposed ban aren’t broadly legal in the state anyway.

Controversial move

The Fish and Wildlife Service published the new proposed rule Friday. It is following in the controversial footsteps of the National Park Service.

The Park Service last year banned several predator hunting practices that the Alaska Board of Game allows.

The state, and sport-hunting advocates, call it a federal incursion on Alaska’s right to manage its own game.

The Fish and Wildlife Service plans nine public hearings across Alaska, starting this month in Kotzebue and Kodiak.

Related stories from around the North:

Canada: More Grizzlies and wolves moving north to High Arctic, Radio Canada International

Finland:  Wolves on the prowl in North Finland, Yle News

Sweden: First wolf killed in Sweden’s controversial hunt, Radio Sweden

United States: Airlines’ new hunting trophy rules worry Alaskans, Alaska Dispatch News

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Liz Ruskin, Alaska Public Media

Liz Ruskin, Alaska Public Media

For more news from Alaska visit Alaska Public Media.

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