Blog: Caribou, development & North Korea – Week in Review

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Commuters walk past a television screen showing a broadcast of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un's New Year speech, at a railroad station in Seoul on January 1, 2016. North Korea announced that it had signed the Svalbard Treaty and that was one of your most-read stories the last week. (Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)
Commuters walk past a television screen showing a broadcast of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un’s New Year speech, at a railroad station in Seoul on January 1, 2016. North Korea announced that it had signed the Svalbard Treaty and that was one of your most-read stories the last week. (Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)

On this week’s news round-up, we bring you some of your most read stories from Eye on the Arctic this past week:

North Korea signs the Svalbard treaty giving it the right to conduct economic and scientific activities on the Arctic archipelago.

-The U.S. military will conduct air exercises over Arctic Finland this May.

– A new book has come out exploring the painful stories of Sami who were abused in church-run schools in Sweden.

-Arctic blogger Heather Exner-Pirot examines the tough realities of successful northern development 

-A recent study looks at caribou behaviour in Arctic Alaska, where some caribou are crossing a mining road… and some aren’t.

That’s all from us for now. We’ll be back next week with your top stories and newsmakers from across the North.

Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

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Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn is a journalist and manages Radio Canada International’s Eye on the Arctic news cooperation project.

Eilís has reported from the Arctic regions of all eight circumpolar countries and has produced numerous documentary and multimedia series about climate change and the issues facing Indigenous peoples in the North.

Her investigative report "Death in the Arctic: A community grieves, a father fights for change," about the violent death of Robert Adams, a 19-year-old Inuk man from Arctic Quebec, received an honourable mention for excellence in reporting on violence and trauma at the 2019 Dart Awards in New York City.

Her multimedia project on the health challenges in the Canadian Arctic, "Bridging the Divide," was a finalist at the 2012 Webby Awards.

Eilís has worked for media organizations in Canada and the United States and as a TV host for the Discovery/BBC Worldwide series "Best in China."

Twitter: @Arctic_EQ

Email: eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

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