Wolves finding new homes in southern Sweden

Illegal killing is affecting the number of wolves in Sweden. This picture shows a wolf in a zoo, in northern Germany. (Klaus-Dietmar Gabbert/AFP/Getty Images)
In past months, there have been a number of reported sightings of wolves in the southern parts of Sweden. (Klaus-Dietmar Gabbert/AFP/Getty Images)
  • In past months, there have been a number of reported sightings of wolves in southern parts of the country.
  • For the first time in modern times, there is a wolf den in Skåne.
  • But while the new dens might be good for the wolf population, the fact that these animals have now settled in a part of the country with more domestic animals might cause problems.

Radio Sweden Audio
For more on the wolf sighting in southern Sweden and how it may be affecting breeding patterns, listen to Radio Sweden’s full report.
Related stories from around the North:

Canada: In Canada’s Northwest Territories, harvesters will get more training to kill wolves, help caribou population, CBC News

Greenland/Denmark: Greenland and Denmark finalize cooperation agreement on marine pollution response, Eye on the Arctic

Finland: Miners hunting for metals to battery cars threaten Finland’s Sámi reindeer herders’ homeland, Yle News

Russia: Record-warm Arctic summer fatal to wild reindeer in Russia, say environmentalists, The Independent Barents Observer

United States: Conservation groups sue government over Alaska mining road, The Associated Press

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