Greenland seeks to boost profile in China with new Beijing office

Jacob Isbosethsen (l.), Greenland’s Head of Representation in China, opens Greenland’s new office in Beijing. (Government of Greenland)

Greenland opened a new office in Beijing last week with a view to boosting its profile in China. 

“For the past 10 years, the Naalakkersuisut [Greenlandic government] has been promoting business in Asia,” Greenland Premier Mute Bourup Egede said in a news release this week.

“It’s very important that we’ve now established a diplomatic presence in Asia, and especially in China, an extremely important export market that must be maintained and where trade relations are developed.”

Economics, trade and cultural exchanges will be among the office’s main priorities, with the Beijing office also being seen as an important jumping off point for Greenland to foster opportunities with Japan and South Korea. 

“Together with our partners and the industry, I see great opportunities in the fact that we can develop our relations with countries in Asia at Greenland’s new permanent representation in Beijing,” Egede said.

Energy, research and new markets

Jacob Isbosethsen has been named as Greenland’s Head of Representation. 

Green energy, research, education, tourism, culture and finding new markets for Greenland’s fishing industry will be among his initial priorities. 

The Greenlandic Government said a formal opening ceremony will take place in Beijing once COVID-19 public health directives allow it.

Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

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Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn is an award-winning journalist and manages Radio Canada International’s Eye on the Arctic news cooperation project. Eilís has reported from the Arctic regions of all eight circumpolar countries and has produced numerous documentary and multimedia series about climate change and the issues facing Indigenous peoples in the North.

Her investigative report "Death in the Arctic: A community grieves, a father fights for change," about the murder of Robert Adams, a 19-year-old Inuk man from Arctic Quebec, received the silver medal for “Best Investigative Article or Series” at the 2019 Canadian Online Publishing Awards. The project also received an honourable mention for excellence in reporting on trauma at the 2019 Dart Awards in New York City.

Her report “The Arctic Railway: Building a future or destroying a culture?” on the impact a multi-billion euro infrastructure project would have on Indigenous communities in Arctic Europe was a finalist at the 2019 Canadian Association of Journalists award in the online investigative category.

Her multimedia project on the health challenges in the Canadian Arctic, "Bridging the Divide," was a finalist at the 2012 Webby Awards.

Her work on climate change in the Arctic has also been featured on the TV science program Découverte, as well as Le Téléjournal, the French-Language CBC’s flagship news cast.

Eilís has worked for media organizations in Canada and the United States and as a TV host for the Discovery/BBC Worldwide series "Best in China."

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