Eye on the Arctic – Week in Review 11/21/14

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A Swedish Navy fast-attack craft patrols in the the Stockholm Archipelago, Sweden, on October 18 2014. The Swedish armed forces launched a military operation around the islands off Stockholm following reports of suspicious 'foreign underwater activity'. Analysis of this event was one of the top stories on Eye on the Arctic this week. (Pontus Lundahl/AFP/Getty Images)
A Swedish Navy fast-attack craft patrols in the the Stockholm Archipelago, Sweden, on October 18 2014. The Swedish armed forces launched a military operation around the islands off Stockholm following reports of suspicious ‘foreign underwater activity’. Analysis of this event was one of the top stories on Eye on the Arctic this week. (Pontus Lundahl/AFP/Getty Images)
On this week’s news round-up, we bring you some of the top headlines from Eye on the Arctic this week:

– A Swedish military expert discusses Russia’s ‘psychological warfare’ on this Nordic state

– A new report looks at how climate change around the world will affect human migration, and suggests governments like Canada need plans to deal with climate refugees.

– And from the blog, Russia discovers a new island in its Arctic region

Eye on the Arctic Feature Interview

 

Kylie Aglukark, Executive Director of the Arctic Children and Youth Foundation. (Courtesy Kylie Aglukark)
Kylie Aglukark, Executive Director of the Arctic Children and Youth Foundation. (Courtesy Kylie Aglukark)

And in honour of Universal Children’s Day on November 20,   Eye on the Arctic’s Eilís Quinn spoke with Kylie Aglukark, a child and youth expert in Canada’s eastern Arctic territory of Nunavut, for this week’s feature interview:

That’s all from Eye on the Arctic this week, we’ll be back on Monday with more news and newsmakers from across the North.

Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

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Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn is a journalist and manages Radio Canada International’s Eye on the Arctic news cooperation project.

Eilís has reported from the Arctic regions of all eight circumpolar countries and has produced numerous documentary and multimedia series about climate change and the issues facing Indigenous peoples in the North.

Her investigative report "Death in the Arctic: A community grieves, a father fights for change," about the violent death of Robert Adams, a 19-year-old Inuk man from Arctic Quebec, received an honourable mention for excellence in reporting on violence and trauma at the 2019 Dart Awards in New York City.

Her multimedia project on the health challenges in the Canadian Arctic, "Bridging the Divide," was a finalist at the 2012 Webby Awards.

Eilís has worked for media organizations in Canada and the United States and as a TV host for the Discovery/BBC Worldwide series "Best in China."

Twitter: @Arctic_EQ

Email: eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

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