Media, energy & kids on COP21:Week in Review

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In the runup to COP21, a Swedish conference was held with children from around the world who have been directly affected by climate change. It was one of your most read stories on Eye on the Arctic this week. (iStock)
In the runup to COP21, a Swedish conference was held with children from around the world who have been directly affected by climate change. It was one of your most read stories on Eye on the Arctic this week. (iStock)

On this week’s news round-up, we bring you some of your most read stories from Eye on the Arctic this past week:

-A look back at the Barents Observer implosion this fall, what it tells us about Russian-Norwegian relations in the Arctic and how the former journalists have moved on.

-In the first instalment of our interview series with Canadian indigenous leaders about COP21, we speak to Ruth Massie, the Grand Chief of the Council of Yukon First Nations.

-Sixty-four children from over twenty countries met in Sweden this week to create a list of climate demands to be presented to world leaders at the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris next week.

-New rules could make it possible to develop more renewable energy in Alaska, by making it easier for independent projects to sell their power to the grid.

– Blogger Mia Bennett visits the Arctic Observing Open Science Meeting in Seattle, Washington, where approximately 200 scientists gathered to discuss Arctic science.

That’s all from us for now. We’ll be back next week with the latest stories and newsmakers from across the North.

Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

 

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Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn is a journalist and manages Radio Canada International’s Eye on the Arctic news cooperation project.

Eilís has reported from the Arctic regions of all eight circumpolar countries and has produced numerous documentary and multimedia series about climate change and the issues facing Indigenous peoples in the North.

Her investigative report "Death in the Arctic: A community grieves, a father fights for change," about the violent death of Robert Adams, a 19-year-old Inuk man from Arctic Quebec, received an honourable mention for excellence in reporting on violence and trauma at the 2019 Dart Awards in New York City.

Her multimedia project on the health challenges in the Canadian Arctic, "Bridging the Divide," was a finalist at the 2012 Webby Awards.

Eilís has worked for media organizations in Canada and the United States and as a TV host for the Discovery/BBC Worldwide series "Best in China."

Twitter: @Arctic_EQ

Email: eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

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