A blood red moon lights up the sky during a total lunar eclipse on April 4, 2015, in Auckland, New Zealand. The shortest total lunar eclipse, or blood moon, of the century lasted just a few minutes.

A blood red moon lights up the sky during a total lunar eclipse on April 4, 2015, in Auckland, New Zealand. The shortest total lunar eclipse, or blood moon, of the century lasted just a few minutes. People in eastern north America will see something similar on Sonday
Photo Credit: Phil Walter/Getty

Super-moon, blood-moon, super eclipse!

Share

People in North America will be able to witness a wonderful astral spectacle this coming Sunday night (Sept 27, 2015).

That’s when we’ll see a total lunar eclipse.

Paul Delaney (MSc) is a professor of physics and astronomy at York University in Toronto Ontario, and director of the York Observatory.

Listen
2011, Paul Delaney, York University professor in Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, and director of the York Observatory
2011, Paul Delaney, York University professor in Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, and director of the York Observatory © YouTube- JoOoHoNo

Professor Delaney points out that there are lunar eclipses about every 6 months, but the one on Sunday will be the last total lunar eclipse visible from eastern Canada, until 2019.

Adding to the spectacle is the fact that right now we are seeing a “super moon”. This was a term coined a few years ago to denote when the moon was at its closest point to Earth during it’s orbit, some 356, 877 km from Earth. The eclipse on Sunday will occur only four days after this close pass.

Multiple images of the moon are are seen in this illustration of the phases of the lunar eclipse over Winnipeg on April 15, 2014. A total lunar eclipse occurs when Earth casts its shadow over the moon. The lunar face can sometimes turn reddish, coppery-brown or orange, tinged by light from the sun that refracts as it passes through our atmosphere.
Multiple images of the moon are are seen in this illustration of the phases of the lunar eclipse over Winnipeg on April 15, 2014. A total lunar eclipse occurs when Earth casts its shadow over the moon. The lunar face can sometimes turn reddish, coppery-brown or orange, tinged by light from the sun that refracts as it passes through our atmosphere. © John Woods/Canadian Press

The eclipse will begin at about 9pm (2100 hours) and start to fade about an hour later. The actual total eclipse will last about 12 minutes.

Professor Delaney says the moon will likely appear a reddish colour due to the small amount of sun light that passed through the Earth’s atmosphere and is filtered and is deflected into the Earth’s own shadow.

The York University Astronomical Observatory and the Astronomy Club at York will host Luna Palooza, free and open to the public, on Sunday, Sept. 27, from 8pm until midnight.

Share
Tagged with: , , , , , ,
Posted in

Do you want to report an error or a typo? Click here!

@*@ Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

Note: By submitting your comments, you acknowledge that Radio Canada International has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Radio Canada International does not endorse any of the views posted. Your comments will be pre-moderated and published if they meet netiquette guidelines.

Netiquette »

When you express your personal opinion in an online forum, you must be as courteous as if you were speaking with someone face-to-face. Insults and personal attacks will not be tolerated. To disagree with an opinion, an idea or an event is one thing, but to show disrespect for other people is quite another. Great minds don’t always think alike—and that’s precisely what makes online dialogue so interesting and valuable.

Netiquette is the set of rules of conduct governing how you should behave when communicating via the Internet. Before you post a message to a blog or forum, it’s important to read and understand these rules. Otherwise, you may be banned from posting.

  1. RCInet.ca’s online forums are not anonymous. Users must register, and give their full name and place of residence, which are displayed alongside each of their comments. RCInet.ca reserves the right not to publish comments if there is any doubt as to the identity of their author.
  2. Assuming the identity of another person with intent to mislead or cause harm is a serious infraction that may result in the offender being banned.
  3. RCInet.ca’s online forums are open to everyone, without regard to age, ethnic origin, religion, gender or sexual orientation.
  4. Comments that are defamatory, hateful, racist, xenophobic, sexist, or that disparage an ethnic origin, religious affiliation or age group will not be published.
  5. In online speak, writing in ALL CAPS is considered yelling, and may be interpreted as aggressive behaviour, which is unpleasant for the people reading. Any message containing one or more words in all caps (except for initialisms and acronyms) will be rejected, as will any message containing one or more words in bold, italic or underlined characters.
  6. Use of vulgar, obscene or objectionable language is prohibited. Forums are public places and your comments could offend some users. People who use inappropriate language will be banned.
  7. Mutual respect is essential among users. Insulting, threatening or harassing another user is prohibited. You can express your disagreement with an idea without attacking anyone.
  8. Exchanging arguments and opposing views is a key component of healthy debate, but it should not turn into a dialogue or private discussion between two users who address each other without regard for the other participants. Messages of this type will not be posted.
  9. Radio Canada International publishes contents in five languages. The language used in the forums has to be the same as the contents we publish. The usage of other languages, with the exception of some words, is forbidden. Messages that are off-topic will not be published.
  10. Making repetitive posts disrupts the flow of discussions and will not be tolerated.
  11. Adding images or any other type of file to comments is forbidden. Including hyperlinks to other websites is allowed, as long as they comply with netiquette. Radio Canada International  is in no way responsible for the content of such sites, however.
  12. Copying and pasting text written by someone else, even if you credit the author, is unacceptable if that text makes up the majority of your comment.
  13. Posting any type of advertising or call to action, in any form, to Radio Canada International  forums is prohibited.
  14. All comments and other types of content are moderated before publication. Radio Canada International  reserves the right to refuse any comment for publication.
  15. Radio Canada International  reserves the right to close a forum at any time, without notice.
  16. Radio Canada International  reserves the right to amend this code of conduct (netiquette) at any time, without notice.
  17. By participating in its online forums, you allow Radio Canada International to publish your comments on the web for an indefinite time. This also implies that these messages will be indexed by Internet search engines.
  18. Radio Canada International has no obligation to remove your messages from the web if one day you request it. We invite you to carefully consider your comments and the consequences of their posting.

*

One comment on “Super-moon, blood-moon, super eclipse!
  1. kushal kumar says:

    The total lunar eclipse on Sunday ( 27 – 28 September) has certain distinguishing features such as : (1). It is combining with Supermoon ( perigee Moon ), (2) It is the fourth total lunar eclipse in series, (3). Energies being generated by planets such as Saturn, Mars, Jupiter , Rahu and Ketu ( Nodes of the Moon) as carriers of these lunar eclipses in contemporary times are not as positive as human beings would have wished . The likely impact of the said phenomenon on earth and its inhabitants was explained by this Vedic astrology writer in article – “Total lunar eclipse of 28 September 2015 and the world”- published in June 2015 in Summer 2015 issue of The Astrologer’s Notebook , a quarterly publication in print from North Port, Florida. Readers may like to know that impacts of such celetial phenomena are not confined to the day these occur. The eclipse comes to 27 September in some parts of west. Some months before and after also, the impact remains. Already in contemporary times recently , these happenings have hit the headlines of newspapers : migrant refugee crisis in Europe, global economy slowdown, volcano eruptions, huge tragedy in holy shrine of Mecca , devastating 8.3 magnitude earthquake in Chile, massive fire in California and elsewhere, threats of war by different countries, burning Middle East, unprecedented happenings in Japan, China and Thailand , danger to food crops by drought, floods, inhospitable weather and storms , unexpected taking over of Kunduz city by Taliban from Afghan forces, Peru declares emergency over protests, unrest in Africa , Russia authorizes use of force in Syria and the like. It looks as if there is widespread environment of uncertainty. Are these uncommon or unusual happenings not a sign of said phenomena on 27 September 2015 ? But if by these phenomenon, world coming to an end or total extinction of mankind is meant, this writer does not subscribe to that opinion or prediction. Mankind is undoubtedly passing through tougher , harder and critical times which may likely cause before mid – 2016 wider damage or harm but end time of mankind as feared by some is neither disclosed nor supported by planetary impacts mentioned here.