Tanks, drilling & polar drones: Arctic week in Review

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New Russian Armata tank is driven during the Victory Parade marking the 70th anniversary of the defeat of the Nazis in World War II, in Red Square, Moscow, Russia, Saturday, May 9, 2015. (Ivan Sekretarev/AP)
New Russian Armata tank is driven during the Victory Parade marking the 70th anniversary of the defeat of the Nazis in World War II, in Red Square, Moscow, Russia, Saturday, May 9, 2015. (Ivan Sekretarev/AP)
On this week’s news round-up, we bring you some of your most read stories from Eye on the Arctic this week:

– Russia unveils a new tank said to be specially made for Arctic conditions

– Authorities approve Royal Dutch Shell’s Arctic drilling plans off northwest Alaska 

-The International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators and the Association of Cruise Operators have banned the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, known to most people as drones, in the Arctic and the Antarctic in the upcoming tourist season

-Russia makes another announcement concerning Arctic research, this time with investment in floating research stations

-And in Europe, Finland receives a warning from the EU concerning the country’s deficit

Friday Feature Interview

And in this week’s Feature Interview, we bring you Eye on the Arctic’s conversation with Doris Bill, the chief of Yukon’s Kwanlin Dun First Nation, about their upcoming investment in a major LNG project and what it means for their community:

That’s all from us for this week. It’s a holiday here in Canada on Monday, so we’ll be back on Tuesday with more stories and newsmakers from across the North.

Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

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Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn is a journalist and manages Radio Canada International’s Eye on the Arctic news cooperation project.

Eilís has reported from the Arctic regions of all eight circumpolar countries and has produced numerous documentary and multimedia series about climate change and the issues facing Indigenous peoples in the North.

Her investigative report "Death in the Arctic: A community grieves, a father fights for change," about the violent death of Robert Adams, a 19-year-old Inuk man from Arctic Quebec, received an honourable mention for excellence in reporting on violence and trauma at the 2019 Dart Awards in New York City.

Her multimedia project on the health challenges in the Canadian Arctic, "Bridging the Divide," was a finalist at the 2012 Webby Awards.

Eilís has worked for media organizations in Canada and the United States and as a TV host for the Discovery/BBC Worldwide series "Best in China."

Twitter: @Arctic_EQ

Email: eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

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