Will Sweden be able to produce enough energy in the future?

Share
The Swedish nuclear power plant Forsmark in 2006. (Fredrik Sandberg/AFP/Getty Images)
The Swedish nuclear power plant Forsmark in 2006. (Fredrik Sandberg/AFP/Getty Images)
This last spring and summer Sweden’s energy companies announced that four of ten nuclear reactors could need to be decommissioned, and there’s no plan for replacing that energy production.

Sweden still gets about 40 percent of its energy from nuclear power.

Magnus Thorstensson, who works for the trade organization Swede Energy, told Radio Sweden, that electricity has been cheap this year, because there has been a lot of snow melting for an extended period, which has meant “a good hydrological year”.

“Water comprises almost 50 percent of electricity production in Sweden,” said Thorstensson.

But building new reactors takes many years, he says, and that’s why he feels the country needs to make a decision about the future of its energy production.

Related stories from around the North:

Canada:  Energy challenges in Canada’s North, Eye on the Arctic

Finland:  One of world’s largest geo-bio-energy facilities slated for Finland, Yle News

Norway: Japan wants wind power from Arctic Norway, Barents Observer

Russia: No alternative to Arctic oil says Russia environment minister, Barents Observer

Sweden: Wind power investments down in Sweden, Radio Sweden

United States: Alternative heating system shows promise for reducing fuel costs in Interior Alaska, Alaska Public Radio Network

 

 

Share
Radio Sweden

Radio Sweden

For more news from Sweden visit Radio Sweden.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *