Saami, the seabed & seismic testing: Arctic week in Review

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A dog team pulls a sled on the ice near Clyde River, Nunavut. A story looking at how the community of Clyde River is fighting seismic testing near their community was among your most-read stories this last week. (Levon Sevunts/Radio Canada International)
A dog team pulls a sled on the ice near Clyde River, Nunavut. A story looking at how the community of Clyde River is fighting seismic testing near their community was among your most-read stories this last week. (Levon Sevunts/Radio Canada International)
On this week’s news round-up, we bring you some of your most read stories from Eye on the Arctic this past week:

-Canada’s Green Party calls on the government to stop seismic testing in Davis Strait in Canada’s eastern Arctic territory of Nunavut.

-Delegates from several Arctic nations are presenting their  Arctic seabed claims at the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS).

-Swedish archbishop wants ‘truth commission’ for abuse against Arctic indigenous Saami

-The Swedish State has appealed the court decision in the landmark Girjas case, where the Sami population of the small village in Northern Sweden won a historic victory in a long-running battle over land rights.

-Military officials get a big surprise when an eagle attacks the drone being used to film a multinational war games exercise in Norway.

That’s all from us for now. We’ll be back next Monday with your top stories and newsmakers from across the North.

Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

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Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn is a journalist and manages Radio Canada International’s Eye on the Arctic news cooperation project.

Eilís has reported from the Arctic regions of all eight circumpolar countries and has produced numerous documentary and multimedia series about climate change and the issues facing Indigenous peoples in the North.

Her investigative report "Death in the Arctic: A community grieves, a father fights for change," about the violent death of Robert Adams, a 19-year-old Inuk man from Arctic Quebec, received an honourable mention for excellence in reporting on violence and trauma at the 2019 Dart Awards in New York City.

Her multimedia project on the health challenges in the Canadian Arctic, "Bridging the Divide," was a finalist at the 2012 Webby Awards.

Eilís has worked for media organizations in Canada and the United States and as a TV host for the Discovery/BBC Worldwide series "Best in China."

Twitter: @Arctic_EQ

Email: eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

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