What the budget says about Sweden’s minority government

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The Riksdag, Sweden’s Parliament, in Stockholm, Sweden. (Ints Kalnins/Reuters)
What does this week’s budget proposal say about the state of the four party co-operation that brought in the government? We spoke to two political commentators for their views and analysis.

In January, following record-long negotiations after the election, a Social Democrat and Green government was formed after an agreement with their former opponents the Liberal and Center Party.

The government’s proposed budget for next year, which was put forward on Wednesday, is the first ‘full’ budget that is based on this agreement.

Radio Sweden met up with Olof Ehrenkrona, political columnist of the conservative Svenska Dagbladet, and Anders Lindberg, chief political editor of the left-leaning Aftonbladet, to hear their assessment of the budget and what it says about the four party co-operation today.

Related stories from around the North:

Canada: Boost in federal infrastructure fund ‘huge’ for Canada’s northern municipalities, CBC News

Finland: Education, wage subsidies key in Finland’s budget for 2020, Yle News

Norway: Political earthquake shakes up Northern Norway, The Independent Barents Observer

Russia: Career diplomat to represent Murmansk region in Russian senate, The Independent Barents Observer

Sweden: Swedish gov’s budget raises fears over inequality, Radio Sweden

United States: Alaska losing $102M in military construction for wall on U.S.-Mexico border, Alaska Public Media

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Ulla Engberg, Radio Sweden

Ulla Engberg, Radio Sweden

For more news from Sweden visit Radio Sweden.

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