Norway’s Equinor is buying LNG from Russian Arctic

The Vladimir Rusanov, a liquefied natural gas (LNG) tanker ship, is pictured in Nantong, China in 2018. The ship is now on it’s way to Norway. (AFP/Getty Images)
A carrier loaded with liquified natural gas from the Yamal Peninsula is on its way to Equinor’s Melkøya plant in Norway.

Tanker Vladimir Rusanov on the 6th of April left the far northern port of Sabetta and set course for a new destination.

It is the first time that natural gas from the Yamal Peninsula is sold to Norway and that a Yamalmax tanker sails with a shipload to Hammerfest on the Barents Sea coast

The Vladimir Rusanov is due to reach its destination on Saturday the 10th April. On board is up to 172.600 cubic meter of natural gas.

Tanker Vladimir Rusanov on the 6th of April left the far northern port of Sabetta and set course for a new destination.

It is the first time that natural gas from the Yamal Peninsula is sold to Norway and that a Yamalmax tanker sails with a shipload to Hammerfest on the Barents Sea coast

The Vladimir Rusanov is due to reach its destination on Saturday the 10th April. On board is up to 172.600 cubic meter of natural gas.

According to Equinor, the LNG from Yamal is needed for the maintenance of its natural gas reservoirs at Melkøya. The far northern LNG plant has been under reconstruction since a serious fire in late September 2020 caused major damage.

The fire destroyed the power turbine, and in addition, large volumes of salty seawater damaged other auxiliary systems such as electrical cables and equipment in the plant.

No plans for additional deliveries

The Russian LNG will be used to keep down temperatures at the Melkøya reservoirs, Equinor representative Cato Osenbroch told the Barents Observer.

He confirms that it is the first time that Equinor imports a shipload from the Yamal LNG. That there are no plans for additional deliveries.

But is not the first time that Equinor cooperates with the operators of the Yamal LNG. In 2017, brand new yamalmax tanker Christophe de Margerie loaded LNG at Melkøya as part of its test sailing in Arctic waters. The ship has since shuttled between Sabetta and foreign terminals along with a fleet of 14 sister ships.

It is also not the first time that Russian LNG carriers pay visits to Norwegian ports. In 2019, a big number of ship-to-ship operations were conducted in the waters near Honningsvåg, Norway. The transshipment of LNG were halted as Novatek started the development of similar services in Russian waters. Since early 2021 a reloading point has been in operation near the island of Kildin.

As the Vladimir Rusanov sails towards Hammerfest, the Rudolf Samoylovich is engaged in reloading of LNG at Kildin.

Equinor launched its Melkøya plant in 2007. Natural gas is extracted at the Snøhvit field in the Barents Sea and pipelined 160 km south to Hammerfest for procession.

The annual LNG export capacity from the plant outside Hammerfest is 5,75 billion cubic meters, equivalent to 4,2 million tonnes.

Related stories from around the North:

Canada: Chinese barges headed for Canadian Northwest Territories on cross-continental delivery mission, CBC News

Estonia: Estonian president favorable towards Arctic railway project, cautious about future of Arctic shipping, Eye on the Arctic

Norway: Arctic shipments to Asia grow as LNG carriers shuttle to eastern markets, The Independent Barents Observer

Russia: Russian transport minister says Northern Sea Route a step closer to year-round passage, The Independent Barents Observer

United States: Carnival Corporation ships switch to cleaner fuel on Arctic cruises, Radio Canada International

Atle Staalesen, The Independent Barents Observer

Atle Staalesen, The Independent Barents Observer

For more news from the Barents region visit The Independent Barents Observer.

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