Arctic shipwreck indentified by Canada as HMS Erebus

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A sea-floor scan shows one of the two long-missing Franklin ships. The masts have been sheared off by ice over the many decades, but the vessel appears otherwise to be in relatively good condition. (Parks Canada /The Canadian Press)
A sea-floor scan shows one of the two long-missing Franklin ships. The masts have been sheared off by ice over the many decades, but the vessel appears otherwise to be in relatively good condition. (Parks Canada /The Canadian Press)
The long-lost shipwreck discovered last month in the Canadian Arctic has been identified as the HMS Erebus, the very ship captained by explorer Sir John Franklin.

Canada’s Prime Minister Stephen Harper made the announcement on Wednesday.

“I am pleased to announce today that the Franklin Expedition ship located by the Victoria Strait Expedition in September has been identified as HMS Erebus,” Harper said in a news release. “The locating and identifying of this ship goes a long way to solving one of Canada’s greatest historical mysteries.”

The HMS Erebus, along with HMS Terror, set sail from Great Britain in order to find the Northwest Passage in 1845. But after years without communication, search parties were dispatched but were unable to locate the ships.

Subsequent searches over the following decades turned up clues but the ships were never found.

Since 2008, Parks Canada has led six searches for the lost vessels.  The most recent one resulted in locating the HMS Erebus.

The site of the HMS Terror is still unknown.

Related stories from around the North:

Canada:  Found at last! Franklin ship lost for 166 years, Radio Canada International

Finland: WWF Finland concerned about oil leak from shipwreck in Baltic Sea, Yle News

Norway: Norway returns Inuit artifacts to Arctic Canadian community, CBC News

United States:  IDs made in 1952 Alaska plane crash, Alaska Dispatch

 

 

 

 

 

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Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn is a journalist and manages Radio Canada International’s Eye on the Arctic news cooperation project.

Eilís has reported from the Arctic regions of all eight circumpolar countries and has produced numerous documentary and multimedia series about climate change and the issues facing Indigenous peoples in the North.

Her investigative report "Death in the Arctic: A community grieves, a father fights for change," about the violent death of Robert Adams, a 19-year-old Inuk man from Arctic Quebec, received an honourable mention for excellence in reporting on violence and trauma at the 2019 Dart Awards in New York City.

Her multimedia project on the health challenges in the Canadian Arctic, "Bridging the Divide," was a finalist at the 2012 Webby Awards.

Eilís has worked for media organizations in Canada and the United States and as a TV host for the Discovery/BBC Worldwide series "Best in China."

Twitter: @Arctic_EQ

Email: eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

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