Politics, pot & polar ice – Arctic week in review

Share
An icebreaker in the Kara Sea in April 2015. Stories concerning drilling and shipping were among you're most read Eye on the Arctic stories this week. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty)
An icebreaker in the Kara Sea in April 2015. Stories concerning drilling and shipping were among your most read Eye on the Arctic stories this week. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty)

On this week’s news round-up, we bring you some of your most read stories from Eye on the Arctic this week:

– A study done in Nunavik, the Inuit self-governing region of Northern Quebec, suggests a link between cannabis use and lowered diabetes risk

-A report out of Alaska finds that the waters where a Shell ship was damaged hadn’t been charted since 1935

-The U.S. Coast Guard lays out the plans, and challenges, of this summer’s Arctic drilling season

– Irene Quaile, the Iceblogger at Germany’s public broadcaster Deutsche Welle,  takes a look at the implications of a six-metre sea level rise for the poles.

A major Arctic meeting is being planned in Alaska and would include U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov.

That’s all from us for this week. We’ll be back on Monday with more stories and newsmakers from across the North.

Write to Eilís Quinn at eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

Share
Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic

Eilís Quinn is a journalist and manages Radio Canada International’s Eye on the Arctic news cooperation project.

Eilís has reported from the Arctic regions of all eight circumpolar countries and has produced numerous documentary and multimedia series about climate change and the issues facing Indigenous peoples in the North.

Her investigative report "Death in the Arctic: A community grieves, a father fights for change," about the violent death of Robert Adams, a 19-year-old Inuk man from Arctic Quebec, received an honourable mention for excellence in reporting on violence and trauma at the 2019 Dart Awards in New York City.

Her multimedia project on the health challenges in the Canadian Arctic, "Bridging the Divide," was a finalist at the 2012 Webby Awards.

Eilís has worked for media organizations in Canada and the United States and as a TV host for the Discovery/BBC Worldwide series "Best in China."

Twitter: @Arctic_EQ

Email: eilis.quinn(at)cbc.ca

Do you want to report an error or a typo? Click here!

Leave a Reply

Note: By submitting your comments, you acknowledge that Radio Canada International has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Radio Canada International does not endorse any of the views posted. Your comments will be pre-moderated and published if they meet netiquette guidelines.
Netiquette »

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *