Lockheed Martin unveils Norway’s first F-35

Norway's new F-35s, which will be based just south of the Arctic Circle, are key to strengthening the country's military capabilities, says Norwegian defense minister Ine Eriksen Soreide (pictured above during a speech at Georgetown University in Washington, DC in 2014. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)
Norway’s new F-35s, which will be based just south of the Arctic Circle, are key to strengthening the country’s military capabilities, says Norwegian defense minister Ine Eriksen Soreide (pictured above during a speech at Georgetown University in Washington, DC in 2014. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)
“The aircraft is a central part of the Government’s efforts to strengthen Norway’s defensive capabilities,” says Minister of Defence, Ine Eriksen Søreide.

Unlike today’s fleet of F-16 fighters, the entire new fleet of combat aircrafts will be based south of the Arctic Circle.

The first of up to 52 F-35 combat aircrafts was rolled out in a flashy ceremony at Lockheed Martin’s production facility in Forth Worth, Texas on Tuesday.

”This is a historic milestone for the Norwegian Armed Forces. I am very pleased to see the results of the extended and thorough selection process that we have completed,” Norway’s Ministry of Defence says.

Will replace F-16 fighters
An F-35 jet sits on the tarmac at its new operational base Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015, at Hill Air Force Base, in northern Utah in the United States. Norway's recent procurement of F-35s is the most costly purchase in the history of the Norwegian armed forces. (Rick Bowmer/AP)
An F-35 jet sits on the tarmac at its new operational base Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015, at Hill Air Force Base, in northern Utah in the United States. Norway’s recent procurement of F-35s is the most costly purchase in the history of the Norwegian armed forces. (Rick Bowmer/AP)

The brand new F-35 will replace Norway’s current flet of more than 30 years old F-16 fighters.

At a cost of 850 million Norwegian kroner each, the aircrafts are the most costly purchase in the history of the Norwegian armed forces. Total final price tag for the 52 aircrafts is, however, not yet clear as the cost per aircraft is likely to drop as production takes off in the years to come.

The aircraft delivered in 2015 and 2016 will be used to train Norwegian and partner pilots at the training center at Luke Air Force Base. The first aircraft to arrive in Norway will be delivered in 2017, and will then begin preparations for Norway’s initial operating capability with the F-35 in 2019.

By 2025, all 52 combat aircrafts will be delivered.

Norway’s current fleet of F-16s are based in Bodø and Ørland. Today’s main airbase in Bodø north of the Arctic Circle will be closed down and the new fleet of F-35s will have Ørland north of Trondheim as their main base.

Related stories from around the North:

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Canada:  Arctic Council Ministerial – Winners and Losers, Blog by Heather Exner-Pirot

Denmark:  Nordics to step up security cooperation on perceived Russian threat, Yle News

Finland: Finland confirms 6th Russian airspace violation in just over a year, Yle News

Iceland:  U.S. military could return to Iceland, Barents Observer

Norway: Norway must ramp up military in response to Russia: report, Barents Observer

Russia: Russian governor praises role of Barents Cooperation, Barents Observer

Sweden:  New security landscape in the Arctic, Radio Sweden

United States:  U.S. general says Alaska military cuts not final without Arctic plan, Alaska Public Radio Network

 

Thomas Nilsen, The Independent Barents Observer

Thomas Nilsen, The Independent Barents Observer

For more news from the Barents region visit The Independent Barents Observer.

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