Dominic Barton, chairman of an advisory committee to federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau, responds to a question during an interview with The Canadian Press Thursday, May 19, 2016 in Montreal. Barton Canada's new ambassador to China has met with the two Canadian men that the People's Republic imprisoned nearly one year ago. (Paul Chiasson/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Canada’s new ambassador in China visits detained Canadians

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Canada’s new ambassador to China led his first consular visits with detained Canadians Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig over the past week, CBC News reported Tuesday, citing anonymous sources.

Global Affairs Canada officials announced Monday that Canadian consular officials conducted consular visits with Spavor on Oct. 28 and Kovrig on Oct. 25.

According to a senior government source, who spoke to CBC News on the condition of anonymity, Ambassador Dominic Barton met with Spavor and Kovrig during the consular visits.

Kovrig, who took a leave of absence from Global Affairs Canada to work as the North East Asia analyst for the non-governmental think tank International Crisis Group, and Spavor, a China-based Canadian entrepreneur, were detained separately by Chinese authorities on Dec. 10, 2018.

Businessman Michael Spavor, left, and former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig, right, remain imprisoned in China. (Associated Press/International Crisis Group/Canadian Press)

Their arrest came days after Canadian officials arrested Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of telecom giant Huawei, at the request of U.S. authorities.

Meng, who is also the daughter of company founder Ren Zhengfei, is fighting extradition to the United States over allegations she was involved in violating sanctions on Iran.

A Canadian court released Meng on bail while she awaits the results of her extradition hearing.

China is demanding Meng’s unconditional release and has been ratcheting up diplomatic and economic pressure on Canada.

Chinese officials said Kovrig and Spavor are being investigated for “endangering national security.”

While the two men receive regular consular visits by Canadian diplomats, they have been denied access to lawyers and their family members since their arrest last year.

Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, who is out on bail and remains under partial house arrest after she was detained last year at the behest of American authorities, carries an umbrella to shield herself from rain as she leaves her home to attend a court hearing, in Vancouver, on Thursday Oct. 3, 2019. (Darryl Dyck/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

China has also placed restrictions on various Canadian exports to China, including canola and meat. In January, China handed a death sentence to a convicted Canadian drug smuggler in a sudden retrial.

Barton was appointed Canada’s ambassador in China in early September.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau fired previous Ambassador John McCallum after he said in an interview with Chinese-language media that Meng had a strong case to fight her extradition to the U.S.

Barton, a former global managing director of consulting firm McKinsey & Co., worked in Asia for 12 years and served on the board of the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada. He also was an adjunct professor at Tsinghua University in Beijing, according to online biographies.

He has also served as the chair of the finance minister’s advisory council on economic growth and has helped the Liberal government shape its economic policies and strategies.

Speaking to the reporters in September, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Barton’s close personal connections to Trudeau and herself means he will have “close and direct contacts” that will help him do the job.

She also said his appointment sends “an important message to China” about how much Canada values its relationship with China.

With files from CBC News and The Associated Press

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2 comments on “Canada’s new ambassador in China visits detained Canadians
  1. Avatar J Drapeau says:

    Why is this man also a founding member of a new organisation calling for massive immigration from China into Canada? As he is a Liberal appointee is this part of Justin’s pro china globalisation plan?

  2. Avatar J Drapeau says:

    This man is no better than McCallum, whose loyalty to Canada could be questioned and who asked China to use its secret agencies to interfere in Canada’s election.

    This man is also the leader of a new somewhat mysterious group that wants absolutely massive immigration to Canada, presumably from China.

    Another liberal who’s loyalty should be questioned