First Flight for biofuel powered engines on civilian aircraft

First Flight for biofuel powered engines on civilian aircraft, one of a multitude of projects in a wide spectrum of disciplines involving research and innovation by the NRC
Photo Credit: NRC

Canada’s national research agency, happy 100th!

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Canada’s National Research Council (NRC) is celebrating 100 years this week. The scientific research body was formed by the federal government in an Order-in-Council on June 6, 1916.

The council, a mix of scientists, industrialists, and bureaucrats was originally designed to come up ways to help the war effort during the First World War.. Since then it has developed into a world-class research and technology organization with a history of amazing creations and world firsts.

Dick Bourgeois-Doyle is Secretary-General of the National Research Council of Canada (NRC)   

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Richard *Dick* Bourgeois-Doyle, executive-director of the National Research Council of Canada (NRC)
Richard *Dick* Bourgeois-Doyle, secretary-general of the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) © NRC

Canada’s research agency was among the early pioneers of such an organization based upon a similar concept in Britain, and about the same time as Australia too was developing a scientific advisory body.

Although created in theory to help with the war effort of WWI, it really had its beginnings instead as an agency to promote students in science.

It then evolved into a scientific centre to solve problems in everything from building construction, to medicine ( e.g., world’s first heart pacemaker), to music (multi-track recording), and into space, such as development of the CanadArm for the international space station.

State-of-the-art 3D laser imaging technology revealed the secrets of the Mona Lisa smile and the facial features of an Egyptian mummy
State-of-the-art 3D laser imaging technology developed at the NRC revealed the secrets of the Mona Lisa smile and the facial features of an Egyptian mummy © NRC
The NRC created the *Pidgeon Process* for metal production of magnesium, still in use today
The NRC created the *Pidgeon Process* for metal production of magnesium, still in use today © NRC

The NRC was also involved in the creation of Canada’s maple leaf flag, one of the most recognizable of world flags. Of the 500,000 visible shades of red the human eye can detect, the NRC was tasked with developing a colour that would be fade resistant in sunlight and weather and reproducible on various materials, eventually creating the bright red known today.

What’s in a colour? Quite a bit. The first Canadian flag with the new fade-resistant red, the standard for the Canadian flag. left to right: Maria Aubrey, Acting President, National Research Council of Canada, Tom Jenkins, Chair, National Research Council of Canada, his Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, and Alex Benay, President and Chief Executive Officer, Canada Science and Technology Museums
What’s in a colour? Quite a bit. The first Canadian flag with the new fade-resistant red, the standard for the Canadian flag. left to right: Maria Aubrey, Acting President, National Research Council of Canada, Tom Jenkins, Chair, National Research Council of Canada, his Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, and Alex Benay, President and Chief Executive Officer, Canada Science and Technology Museums © NRC

Canada’s National Research Council continues to be a technological problem solver and innovator, and research leader. Although its primary function remains research for domestic purposes it is also occasionally sought by exterior groups to carry out certain specific projects, such as a recent request by the World Curling Federation, and is a partner in the development of the new ultra-sophisticated 30-metre telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. This super advanced telescope is rated to have light-gathering capability and sharpness far exceeding other telescopes including the Hubble Space telescope

Inventor George Klein and others at NRC, 1953. The now ubiquitous *mobility scooters* one sees everywhere are an evolution of the electric wheelchair which itself was invented by Klein, another world’s first for the NRC
Amazing inventor George Klein and others at NRC, 1953. The now ubiquitous *mobility scooters* one sees everywhere are an evolution of the electric wheelchair which itself was invented by Klein, another world’s first for the NRC © NRC
The NRC developed this new streamlined design specifcally created to keep smoke out of the driver’s compartment The locomotive was used during part of the Royal Tour of Canada in 1939, and adopted for the new Thomas and Friends childrens movie https://www.rcinet.ca/en/2016/04/12/canadian-locomotive-joins-thomas-and-friends/
From steam-engines, to space, 100 years of NRC. The NRC developed this new streamlined design specifcally created to keep smoke out of the driver’s compartment The locomotive was used during part of the Royal Tour of Canada in 1939, and adopted for the new Thomas and Friends childrens movie https://www.rcinet.ca/en/2016/04/12/canadian-locomotive-joins-thomas-and-friends/ © NRC
Established in 1916, the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) has mobilized the country’s science and engineering resources to build new industries, ensure national security, and improve the health and well-being of all Canadians. Today, as NRC celebrates 100 years of innovations, it prepares to tackle another century of critical societal and economic challenges facing the country. NRC will uphold its legacy as Canada’s leading catalyst for science, technology and innovation by building on its scientific breakthroughs and research achievements that have had transformational impacts on the lives of people in Canada and around the world
Established in 1916, the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) has mobilized the country’s science and engineering resources to build new industries, ensure national security, and improve the health and well-being of all Canadians. Today, as NRC celebrates 100 years of innovations, it prepares to tackle another century of critical societal and economic challenges facing the country. NRC will uphold its legacy as Canada’s leading catalyst for science, technology and innovation by building on © NRC

The National Research Council of Canada (NRC) exists under the National Research Council Act and is a departmental corporation named in Schedule II of the Financial Administration Act. The objectives of NRC are to create, acquire and promote the application of scientific and engineering knowledge to meet Canadian needs for economic, regional and social development and to promote and provide for the use of scientific and technical information by the people and the Government of Canada. In delivering its mandate, NRC reports under the following program activities: research and development; and technology and industry support. These program activities also include NRC’s priorities of enhancing development of sustainable technology clusters for wealth creation and social capital as well as program management for a sustainable organization.

— NRC Annual Report 2007-2008

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