Smoke rises from stacks at Ontario’s coal-fired Nanticoke Generating Station in this 2007 file photo. The province phased out coal-fired electricity generation in 2014.

Smoke rises from stacks at Ontario’s coal-fired Nanticoke Generating Station in this 2007 file photo. The province phased out coal-fired electricity generation in 2014.
Photo Credit: J.P. Moczulski/Reuters

Canada to end coal-fired power plants, but will Canada be greener?

Share

This week the federal government announced that it intended to phase out the use of coal in Canadian power plants by 2030.

But how green is this, especially in light of other possible government policies which may increase greenhouse gasses?

Keith Stewart is a researcher with Greenpeace Canada, and head of the Climate and Energy Campaign.

Listen
Keith Stewart is energy campainger with Greenpeace Canada
Keith Stewart is energy campainger with Greenpeace Canada © supplied

In announcing the plan, Canada’s Environment Minister Catherine McKenna said,  “Taking traditional coal power out of our energy mix and replacing it with cleaner technologies will significantly reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, improve the health of Canadians, and benefit generations for years to come”.

Only four provinces still have coal-fired electricity generating plants.

Alberta had already announced it would shut down coal-fired plants by 2030 while Nova Scotia would be allowed to maintain its plant for back-up purposes after 2030 if it could achieve greenhouse gas reductions elsewhere.

A worker holds a piece of coal destined for a coal-fired power plant. The federal government announced plans Monday to take the country’s coal plants offline by 2030, which is expected to result in a reduction of roughly 61 megatonnes of annual emissions. (Rogelio V. Solis/AP Photo
A worker holds a piece of coal destined for a coal-fired power plant. The federal government announced plans Monday to take the country’s coal plants offline by 2030, which is expected to result in a reduction of roughly 61 megatonnes of annual emissions. Some 42,000 jobs may be affected directly or indirectly © Rogelio V. Solis/AP Photo

Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick plants were to remain serviceable until 2040 and both are concerned about the federal plan which would mean an early shutdown. However, the early phase out of coal plants in those provinces is likely to have costs to taxpayers and deals have to be negotiated with the federal government towards mitigation policies.  In addition, there are some 42,000 jobs either directly or indirectly related to the coal and power facilities which will be affected by the federal plan.

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is the most vocal in opposition saying the unilateral federal announcement undermines the December federal-provincial meetings where a unified climate strategy was to be developed.

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall isn’t pleased with Ottawa’s announcement Monday that coal power will be phased out by 2030.
Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall isn’t pleased with Ottawa’s announcement Monday that coal power will be phased out by 2030. © CBC News

On the other side of the issue are the federal government’s plans to approve a liquid natural gas port facility in British Columbia, which could add up to 17 megatonnes of greenhouse gas. This goes along with an apparently favourable position on various major pipeline projects, also considered as potentially adding greatly to greenhouse gas generation.

Greenpeace campaigner Stewart says it seems this government, like many others, wants it both ways in proceeding with some green initiatives, while approving other polluting ones.

He says with pending decisions on various projects it is hard to give the current Canadian government a grade, but tentatively gives them a “B”. If the Trudeau Liberals do approve of pipelines, he says they would immediately get an “F” failing grade.

Additional information -sources

Share
Categories: Economy, Environment, International, Internet, Science and Technology, Politics
Tags: , , ,

Do you want to report an error or a typo? Click here!

@*@ Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

Note: By submitting your comments, you acknowledge that Radio Canada International has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Radio Canada International does not endorse any of the views posted. Your comments will be pre-moderated and published if they meet netiquette guidelines.

Netiquette »

When you express your personal opinion in an online forum, you must be as courteous as if you were speaking with someone face-to-face. Insults and personal attacks will not be tolerated. To disagree with an opinion, an idea or an event is one thing, but to show disrespect for other people is quite another. Great minds don’t always think alike—and that’s precisely what makes online dialogue so interesting and valuable.

Netiquette is the set of rules of conduct governing how you should behave when communicating via the Internet. Before you post a message to a blog or forum, it’s important to read and understand these rules. Otherwise, you may be banned from posting.

  1. RCInet.ca’s online forums are not anonymous. Users must register, and give their full name and place of residence, which are displayed alongside each of their comments. RCInet.ca reserves the right not to publish comments if there is any doubt as to the identity of their author.
  2. Assuming the identity of another person with intent to mislead or cause harm is a serious infraction that may result in the offender being banned.
  3. RCInet.ca’s online forums are open to everyone, without regard to age, ethnic origin, religion, gender or sexual orientation.
  4. Comments that are defamatory, hateful, racist, xenophobic, sexist, or that disparage an ethnic origin, religious affiliation or age group will not be published.
  5. In online speak, writing in ALL CAPS is considered yelling, and may be interpreted as aggressive behaviour, which is unpleasant for the people reading. Any message containing one or more words in all caps (except for initialisms and acronyms) will be rejected, as will any message containing one or more words in bold, italic or underlined characters.
  6. Use of vulgar, obscene or objectionable language is prohibited. Forums are public places and your comments could offend some users. People who use inappropriate language will be banned.
  7. Mutual respect is essential among users. Insulting, threatening or harassing another user is prohibited. You can express your disagreement with an idea without attacking anyone.
  8. Exchanging arguments and opposing views is a key component of healthy debate, but it should not turn into a dialogue or private discussion between two users who address each other without regard for the other participants. Messages of this type will not be posted.
  9. Radio Canada International publishes contents in five languages. The language used in the forums has to be the same as the contents we publish. The usage of other languages, with the exception of some words, is forbidden. Messages that are off-topic will not be published.
  10. Making repetitive posts disrupts the flow of discussions and will not be tolerated.
  11. Adding images or any other type of file to comments is forbidden. Including hyperlinks to other websites is allowed, as long as they comply with netiquette. Radio Canada International  is in no way responsible for the content of such sites, however.
  12. Copying and pasting text written by someone else, even if you credit the author, is unacceptable if that text makes up the majority of your comment.
  13. Posting any type of advertising or call to action, in any form, to Radio Canada International  forums is prohibited.
  14. All comments and other types of content are moderated before publication. Radio Canada International  reserves the right to refuse any comment for publication.
  15. Radio Canada International  reserves the right to close a forum at any time, without notice.
  16. Radio Canada International  reserves the right to amend this code of conduct (netiquette) at any time, without notice.
  17. By participating in its online forums, you allow Radio Canada International to publish your comments on the web for an indefinite time. This also implies that these messages will be indexed by Internet search engines.
  18. Radio Canada International has no obligation to remove your messages from the web if one day you request it. We invite you to carefully consider your comments and the consequences of their posting.

*

One comment on “Canada to end coal-fired power plants, but will Canada be greener?
  1. Avatar Selina Raison says:

    Question:
    If every single “Coal Energy Plant” on this PLANET were to shut down immediately (TODAY), could our earth repair itself of the global damage that’s happening now??? It just boggles my mind that this kind of pollution is still allowed to continue at all, knowing of the damage it’s causing. I just don’t understand. I just read a story on FB about “good things” that are about to or happening now like producing drinking water from the ocean’s water….to be able to produce water in the desert from this machine…someone developed a artificial womb for premature babies….and so on and so on. What does that all matter if humans are not here to reap the rewards? To think that those plants “of the world” could or would actually stop operating is a real dream that will never happen. Real sad isn’t it that our beautiful planet is dying right in front of our eyes and there are no extreme decisions working right this minute. Why do we have to wait till 2030 or 2040 for changes to happen, especially with all of this non-polluting natural energy that we have in today’s age? I just don’t understand, please enlighten me. :-(…..